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(3 Hours) Prerequisites: ENGL 102 or appropriate score on assessment test. This course is a prerequisite in a sequence of courses leading to ENGL 121. Beginning with a review of basic sentence skills, this course focuses on paragraph development, including subject selection, topic sentences, methods of development, transitional devices and effective introductions and conclusions. Students must take the JCCC writing assessment test. This course is in a sequence of courses leading to ENGL 121. Scrutinize the use of a research style, making certain documentation is thorough and the style accurately employed. The last part of the course will focus on developing multi-paragraph essays. Prerequisites: ENGL 106 or appropriate placement test score or both EAP 113 and EAP 117. Composition I focuses on writing nonfiction prose suitable in its expression and content to both its occasion and its audience. Students will have an opportunity to improve in all phases of the writing process: discovering ideas, gathering information, planning and organizing, drafting, revising and editing. Select and correctly use vocabulary appropriate to the topic and audience. Write sentences that grammatically convey clear and complex relationships. Use figurative language appropriately to add clarity and interest. Each text written in the course should clearly communicate a central idea or thesis, contain sufficient detail to be lively and convincing, reflect the voice of the writer and use carefully edited standard written English. Some sections of this course are tailored to meet the needs of specific student populations, such as veterans or Honors students, or students in specific programs, such as Hospitality or Technology. (1 Hour) Prerequisites: Honors department approval. One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. Critique the work of peers to assist them in improving the focus, organization, support, clarity, correctness and effectiveness of their written discourse. Collaborate on the revision of the writer’s own and peers’ compositions. By the end of the semester, students should have completed at least 20 pages (approximately 5,000 words) of revised and edited prose. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Revise organizational patterns to allow ideas to progress more smoothly and logically through coherent sentences, paragraphs and major points of development. Insert additional materials where needed for support and eliminate repetitive, irrelevant or ineffective and unreliable information. Students must take the JCCC writing assessment test or submit an ACT score of 19 or higher before enrolling. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information. Composition II focuses on skills essential to gathering, comprehending, analyzing, evaluating and synthesizing information from a variety of academic and non-academic sources. Differentiate between explanatory, evaluative and argumentative purposes. Write texts that include fair explanations, evaluations and arguments. Because writing is integral to college coursework and the workplace, this course emphasizes the rhetorical skills needed to understand and produce complex compositions in a variety of forms, which may include essays, presentations, reports, social media posts and other digital forms of communication. Composition II emphasizes the deep revision needed to compose expository, evaluative and persuasive prose. Write persuasive texts using logos, ethos and pathos. Some sections of this course are tailored to meet the needs of specific student populations, such as veterans or Honors students, or students in specific programs, such as Hospitality or Technology. (1 Hour) Prerequisites: Honors department approval. One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. By the end of the semester, students should have completed at least 25 pages (approximately 6,250 words) of revised and edited prose. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Analyze students’ own biases when encountering texts. Identify language in published texts that reveal authorial bias. Examine published texts for sufficient and appropriate support. Write logically structured and developed texts for audience comprehension. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Identify and categorize specific types of arguments made within a text. Discuss the use of supporting details and information in a text. JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. Define how subject, audience and purpose interact to create effective discourse. Demonstrate ability to apply appropriate stylistic conventions. Demonstrate the ability to apply appropriate formatting conventions. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information. This course introduces students to technical and professional writing. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. Students will apply the writing process, engaging rhetorical strategies, when constructing typical workplace correspondence, such as memos, letters, reports, and digital documents (including writings for social media and asynchronous presentations). To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. By the end of the semester, students should have written approximately 5,000 words in revised and edited documents. Students will read, discuss and analyze works from three literary genres: the short story, the poem and the play. This survey course introduces students to a representative sample of texts created by women from the mid-seventeenth century to present. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202). Composition II focuses on skills essential to gathering, comprehending, analyzing, evaluating and synthesizing information from a variety of academic and non-academic sources. Locate and evaluate supporting material from library, online and field research, including professional journals and digital media. Locate in sources useful evidence, examples and details which aid in advancing a student’s own argument. Select and utilize evidence free of logical fallacies. Analyze, organize, introduce and interpret evidence that supports a text’s main idea. Integrate appropriate source materials into original texts, using quotations, paraphrases and summaries. Quote from source materials accurately and without misrepresentation, making clear the context of the original material. Paraphrase complex source materials accurately and effectively. Summarize complex texts without distorting the source materials. Incorporate other viewpoints—including opinions of people who hold different political, religious or cultural views—into written texts. Document outside sources with an appropriate citation system. Students will focus on effective technical writing criteria: clarity, conciseness, document design, organization, and accuracy. Students will learn and apply the technical vocabulary used in the criticism of these literary forms. (1 Hour) Prerequisites: Honors department approval. One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. Written primarily in English, the texts may include fiction, non-fiction, poetry, drama and/or film. Using the lens of gender, students will explore the social, historical, political and cultural contexts relevant to the literature. Because writing is integral to college coursework and the workplace, this course emphasizes the rhetorical skills needed to understand and produce complex compositions in a variety of forms, which may include essays, presentations, reports, social media posts and other digital forms of communication. Demonstrate the ability to read and formulate objectives of an assignment. Formulate controlling ideas for texts suitable to the range of assignments and audiences for academic writing. Employ appropriate methods for discovering ideas and gathering materials for a range of purposes and subjects, including library, online and field research. Take notes which accurately reflect source materials. Express suitable controlling ideas for research essays. Organize research and other materials into patterns of organization appropriate to support a complex thesis. Accuracy specifically requires students to follow standard English grammar and punctuation rules. Students will be introduced to representative works from various literary traditions and cultures, including numerous works from contemporary writers. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. This course introduces students to the literary aspects of Bible. The readings, discussions and related writing projects will emphasize the relationship between mainstream America and borderland writers; explore the cultural and artistic context of the writers and their works; recognize and assess the use of major narrative and rhetorical strategies; and stimulate consideration of issues surrounding assimilation, identity formation, code-switching and cultural hybridity. Further, students will identify significant literary devices and genres as employed by these authors. (1 Hour) Prerequisites: Honors department approval. One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. Identify techniques used by authors to address specific audiences in texts, such as prose, images, videos, tables and graphs. Analyze the authors’ intended effect upon an audience. Composition II emphasizes the deep revision needed to compose expository, evaluative and persuasive prose. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Games, particularly Role-Playing Games (RPGs) and other participatory narratives, share many properties with traditional narratives, yet differ significantly from their linear counterparts. Students will read extracts from both the Hebrew and Greek portions of the Bible in translation. The course will emphasize the dynamic relationship between the literature and its contexts. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Some sections of this course are tailored to meet the needs of specific student populations, such as veterans or Honors students, or students in specific programs, such as Hospitality or Technology. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information. This course teaches students to apply the writing process as well as fundamental rhetorical and composition skills to various interactive media including web pages, CD-ROMs/DVD, e-mail, kiosks, support materials, simulations, social networking and other electronic media. This course focuses on the elements of narrative as well as the principles that drive virtual or alternative possible worlds (both fictive and reality-based), and it will provide students with practice writing and designing artifacts that demonstrate an understanding of plot, character, setting and the impact of structure and purpose in game development. They will learn to analyze these readings as representatives of the Bible's many literary forms. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Students will study and practice writing in two or three of the major literary modes of writing: poetry, fiction, and possibly drama. By the end of the semester, students should have completed at least 25 pages (approximately 6,250 words) of revised and edited prose. The instruction will focus on skills essential to selecting, evaluating and synthesizing information from primary and secondary sources; in addition, it will emphasize the different approaches to organization that these media require as well as the variety of discourse styles used in informative, instructional, persuasive and entertainment media texts. Students will also sample from later literary works that draw on biblical sources for their inspiration. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information. This course offers challenging insights into the act of writing. The reading assignments are based on the premise that, to be a good writer, students must have knowledge of literary techniques and be perceptive readers and critics. Students will write essays demonstrating their understanding of the works studied. We will move beyond Composition I and Composition II, focusing on writing persuasively to a select audience; working together to anticipate and defuse objections; supply convincing evidence; synthesize the ideas of others to support our ends; look critically at all sources; and perfect a mature, polished style that is suitable to audience and occasion. Students will examine techniques of two or possibly three of the literary genres and then apply their knowledge to write in each genre. (1 Hour) Prerequisites: Honors department approval. One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. In addition, they will read other students' work and provide useful feedback on that work. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information. In this class, students will build upon the knowledge and skills learned in ENGL 223. Employ strategies for matching diction, tone and style to audience expectations. This course offers serious writing students the opportunity to continue growing as writers and readers by studying the art of writing, producing a consistent body of writing, examining one another’s work and providing a supportive environment. Critique own and others’ texts to improve the focus, organization, support, clarity, correctness and effectiveness. Collaborate with peers to make significant revisions in the organization, development, style and mechanics of texts using comments from the instructor and/or other students. Students may meet the written requirements of the course by writing poetry, fiction, creative nonfiction, dramatic scripts or any combination of the genres. (1 Hour) Prerequisites: Honors department approval. One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. Locate supporting materials and evidence from personal experience as well as field/library research. Write essays and other written discourse that present ideas and support them with sufficient detail to be convincing and interesting. Revise paragraphs so that ideas progress logically through coherent sentences. Students will provide written and oral critiques of their classmates’ work. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Begin a writing task by using appropriate methods for discovering and narrowing ideas. 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In addition to writing fiction of their own, students will analyze published works of fiction, and they will provide feedback on their classmates’ manuscripts. Students will study terms, patterns and forms that are useful for an understanding and appreciation of poetic verse. This course features significant opportunities to write about the literature and the reader's response to it. In doing so, they will articulate a critical vocabulary for the craft of fiction and the writing process. The course will cover major literary, historical and cultural movements as they relate to poetry. Students will learn the historical fictional precedents of the short story; the similarities and differences between the short story and other narrative forms, such as the novel; the differences between the short story and its historical precedents, between short stories and film adaptations of them, and between commercial and literary short stories. (1 Hour) Prerequisites: Honors department approval. 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Write at least one essay that achieves a grade of C" or better. Demonstrate a good command of the mechanics of writing (adhering to the departmental standard established in the Major and Minor Errors Checklist). Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Determine purpose of essay and write for a specific audience. Recognize and write effective introductory, body, and concluding paragraphs. Select and use an appropriate overall organizational pattern for the essay. Select and use effective organizational patterns for paragraphs. JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information. Children's Literature is meant for all students interested in bringing children and books together but is especially suited for those who are students with English or education majors; teachers already in the elementary school classroom; parents; those working with children in preschools, day-care centers and libraries; and grandparents and prospective parents. Expand paragraphs using several of the patterns of development. Develop ability to recognize and achieve a degree of sentence variety. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. The course would also benefit those exploring the field of writing and illustrating for children. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Students will identify children's needs and interests, list the criteria for choosing books for children, and demonstrate the means by which we can bring children and books together. (1 Hour) Prerequisites: Honors department approval. One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202). Paraphrase sources while avoiding distortion of meaning. Students will read, examine and critique a variety of children's literature selected by author, genre and historical time period. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Prerequisites: ENGL 106 or appropriate placement test score or both EAP 113 and EAP 117. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Determine purpose of paragraph and write for a specific audience. Composition I focuses on writing nonfiction prose suitable in its expression and content to both its occasion and its audience. Include outside materials, such as text, tables, graphs, video or images, in original texts while employing academic conventions and standard punctuation for doing same. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information. This course introduces students to the analysis of plays as literature. Develop ability to recognize and construct the four grammatical sentence types. Identify and use the four functional sentence types. Recognize and manipulate the fundamental units of the sentence: phrase and clause. Students will have an opportunity to improve in all phases of the writing process: discovering ideas, gathering information, planning and organizing, drafting, revising and editing. Describe the ideal audience for an essay and other forms of discourse. Create patterns of organization appropriate to the audience and rhetorical aims of an essay and other forms of written discourse. Write essays and other forms of written discourse of varying length and complexity with expressive, informative and persuasive purposes. Beginning with the Greek dramatists and ending with the contemporary scene, students will read full-length plays and the comments of playwrights, directors, actors and critics. In this survey course, the student will study British literature written up to 1800, ranging from the Anglo-Saxon to the Augustan eras, including works by major authors such as Chaucer, Shakespeare, Milton and Swift. Apply transitions and other devices for linking sentences and paragraphs. Use global arrangement strategies: chronological, order of importance, spatial, classification, comparison/contrast. Develop paragraphs and essays with effective examples. Recognize the difference between general and specific examples and apply them appropriately. Recognize the difference between abstract and concrete examples and apply them appropriately. Develop some facility with the patterns of development: description, narration, illustration, comparison/contrast, process analysis, definition, classification, cause/effect. Revise writing for content, organization, and expression. Recognize weaknesses in material and demonstrate ability to add, delete, or rearrange material as required to correct the weaknesses. Recognize and correct flaws in organization in the essay and paragraph (ranging from an overall essay pattern such as comparison/contrast through cohesive devices such as thesis and topic sentences to sentence-level connectors such as transitional words and synonyms). Recognize and correct flaws in expression on the word and sentence level (ranging from precise word choice to variety in sentence structure). Revise writing for standard matters of mechanical correctness. Recognize and correct writing for errors in grammar, spelling, and punctuation. Perform to the departmental standard as set forth in the English Program Guide on the majority of evaluated paragraph and essay assignments (no more than seven major errors per essay; no more than three major errors per paragraph). Each text written in the course should clearly communicate a central idea or thesis, contain sufficient detail to be lively and convincing, reflect the voice of the writer and use carefully edited standard written English. They will analyze drama from psychological, historical, philosophical, structural and dramatic perspectives. The course will emphasize the relationships among influential writers, their lives and times. Some sections of this course are tailored to meet the needs of specific student populations, such as veterans or Honors students, or students in specific programs, such as Hospitality or Technology. Students will write essays demonstrating their understanding of the works studied. Additionally, the student will explore the literary differences between the British culture and one other culture that was governed by the British Empire. (1 Hour) Prerequisites: Honors department approval. One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. By the end of the semester, students should have completed at least 20 pages (approximately 5,000 words) of revised and edited prose. Such non-British literary works may be from Australia, India, Asia, various regions of Africa or the Middle East. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Students must take the JCCC writing assessment test or submit an ACT score of 19 or higher before enrolling. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information. In this survey course, the student will study British literature written from 1800 to the present. Major authors from the Romantic, Victorian and Modern eras, such as Austen, Blake, Wordsworth, the Shelleys, Dickens, Tennyson, the Brownings, Eliot and Woolf, will be included. The course will emphasize the relationships among influential writers, their lives and times. Additionally, the student will explore the literary differences between the British culture and one other culture that was governed by the British Empire. Such non-British literary works may be chosen from the traditions of Australia, India, Asia, various regions of Africa or the Middle East. (1 Hour) Prerequisites: Honors department approval. One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. British Literature I is NOT a prerequisite for this course. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information. This course examines the literature of science fiction, especially from 1960 through the present. Students read, analyze, evaluate and discuss the literature surrounding American popular music. This survey course is a stand-alone course which need not be taken after American Literature I, covering the pre-Colonial period through the post-Civil War era. World Masterpieces introduces students to literary study using major literary works composed from the times of Homer to Shakespeare that have been influential in shaping and expressing values of Western culture. Students explore the unifying concepts of science and technology, depicted through imaginative narratives of the past, present and future. No less than any other form of literature, all genres of American popular music are intertwined, engaged in dialogue and revealing of the American experience. This survey course is a stand-alone course that presents a series of literary works by American writers that reflects the attitudes and identity of our national literature and culture from the pre-Colonial Period through the post-Civil War era. American Literature II presents a series of literary works by American writers that reflects the attitudes and identity of our national literature and culture from the post-Civil War era to the present. Students will read selections representative of the epic, tragic, comic and lyric traditions primarily to gain knowledge of the works assigned. Students read short stories and/or novels, view science fiction films and discuss key science fiction concepts. By engaging with, comparing and evaluating the conversations between popular music and fiction, poetry and criticism, students will explore the social, historical, political and cultural contexts relevant to the literature. By grappling with the ideas and characterizations presented in each assigned literary work, the student develops meaningful insights into the attitudes and human conditions that have influenced America's national literary identity. By grappling with the ideas and characterizations presented in each assigned literary work, the student develops meaningful insights into the attitudes and human conditions that have influenced and are still influencing America's national literary identity. In addition, students will analyze the assigned texts as literary works and as cultural artifacts and influences. Through this process, students will discover, analyze, synthesize and evaluate the ongoing negotiations between a great diversity of cultural aesthetics, political interests and public opinions in the shaping of American identity. Finally, students will compare and contrast contemporary understandings of the individual and society with those expressed in the works studied. (1 Hour) Prerequisites: Honors department approval. One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. Apply to their own writing, critical feedback from group members. Revise writing for content, organization, style, and mechanics. Proficiency with Skills Needed to Enter Introduction to Writing A. In completing the course objectives, students will learn the conventions of writing about literature and become familiar with general reference materials useful in studying literature. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Write at least one major paragraph assignment that achieves a "C" or better. Demonstrate a good command of the mechanics of writing (adhering to the departmental standard established in the Major and Minor Errors Checklist). Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. 20-50% of grade Short Paragraphs 20-50% of grade Objective Tests and/or Quizzes 0-20% of grade Participation 0-30% of grade Homework 0-10% of grade The Writing Process 100% Total Grade Criteria: A = 90 - 100% B = 80 - 89% C = 70 - 79% D = 60 - 69% F = 0 - 59% JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. Apply to their own writing, critical feedback from group members. Use All Stages of the Writing Process to Develop and Refine Writing A. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information. This course examines the development of cinema from the early experiments in the late 1800s up to the present day, presenting the history and art of both American and international cinema. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. Students read the textbook, view short and full-length films, and discuss important cinematic techniques and concepts. (1 Hour) Prerequisites: Honors department approval. One-credit hour honors contract is available to qualified students who have an interest in a more thorough investigation of a topic related to this subject. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Students verify their judgments by summarizing and analyzing these important concepts, using discussions, and writing effective, well-organized essays in response to specific films. An honors contract may incorporate research, a paper, or project and includes individual meetings with a faculty mentor. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202). Student must be currently enrolled in the regular section of the courses or have completed it the previous semester. Work in groups to develop and refine the students' writing. Prerequisites: ENGL 102 or appropriate score on assessment test. Contact the Honors Program Office, COM 201, for more information. Beginning with a review of basic sentence skills, this course focuses on paragraph development, including subject selection, topic sentences, methods of development, transitional devices and effective introductions and conclusions. Students must take the JCCC writing assessment test. This course is in a sequence of courses leading to ENGL 121. Work Effectively in Groups to Develop and Refine Writing A. (1-3 Hour) Prerequisites: 2.0 GPA minimum and department approval. The last part of the course will focus on developing multi-paragraph essays. Independent study is a directed, structured learning experience offered as an extension of the regular curriculum. It is intended to allow individual students to broaden their comprehension of the principles of and competencies associated with the discipline or program. Identify elements of effective development such as appropriate details and complete explanations. Its purpose is to supplement existing courses with individualized, in-depth learning experiences. Such learning experiences may be undertaken independent of the traditional classroom setting, but will be appropriately directed and supervised by regular instructional staff. Analyze student models and other readings in order to apply basic composition and rhetorical strategies to the students' own written paragraphs. Identify organizational elements such as topic and subtopic sentences and coherence devices. Total contact hours vary based on the learning experience. English 292 is a 200-level thematic literature and writing course. Identify and write complete, simple, compound, and gerund and infinitive subjects. Identify and write predicates and complete verbs within them, including action, linking, helping, and compound verbs. Identify and write a variety of phrase and clause types, including the following: noun, verb, prepositional, appositive, infinitive, gerund, participial, and absolute phrases as well as main and subordinate clauses (noun, adjective, adverb.) E. Begin paragraphs with topic sentences that accurately describe the main idea of the paragraph. Use subtopic sentences within paragraphs where appropriate to introduce main points. End paragraphs with concluding sentences that reiterate the paragraph's main idea and make some final point. Include coherence devices within and between sentences. Construct paragraphs using the following organizational strategies: spatial, chronological, and order of importance. Write paragraphs using several patterns of development refined through detailed examples and clear explanations. In this class, students will have the opportunity to refine their critical reading and writing skills by investigating in-depth a single important theme, topic or genre (e.g., environmental literature, the literature of illness, detective fiction, travel literature, the documentary film tradition, creative non-fiction). Identify and write all sentence types: simple compound, complex, and compound/complex. Students will engage with a wide range of texts, including those from print, film, and other media. English 102 is designed to give students a solid foundation in grammar and punctuation, helping students overcome obstacles in mechanics that have in the past interfered with their ability to communicate clearly. Recognize single, coordinate, cumulative, irregular, comparative, superlative, and noun adjectives. Identify-ly and non -ly, irregular, comparative and superlative adverbs. Recognize prepositions, including those indicating place and time. Identify coordinating and subordinating conjunctions as well as conjunctive adverbs. The course may also include selections drawn from various national literatures in translation and a range of historical periods. This sentence-level work soon leads to short paragraphs that offer students the opportunity to practice and refine their writing process. Recognize and write nouns and noun substitutes in the following sentence positions: subjects, objects, complements. Identify personal, relative, and indefinite pronouns. Special Topics in Literature and Composition may be repeated for credit but only on different topics. Students in English 102 will learn to view their writing within a rhetorical context of author, message, and audience. The Eight Parts of Speech, Phrases, Clauses and Sentence Types A. Clear, well-organized, well-developed, and mechanically sound foundational writing is the ultimate objective of Writing Strategies. Identify the eight parts of speech and recognize them by function. Identify action, linking, helping, and compound verbs. Use the three basic verb tenses (present, past, future), the progressive tenses, and the perfect tenses effectively. This course is a prerequisite in a sequence of courses leading to ENGL 121. Students will focus on effective technical writing criteria: clarity, conciseness, document design, organization, and accuracy. Analyze the merits of evidence used within a text, including the reliability of facts and examples employed by the writer. By the end of the semester, students should have written approximately 5,000 words in revised and edited documents. Students will apply the writing process, engaging rhetorical strategies, when constructing typical workplace correspondence, such as memos, letters, reports, and digital documents (including writings for social media and asynchronous presentations). Clarify ideas by answering reporter's questions and by providing specific, quantifiable information. Write concisely by limiting the length of words, the length of sentences, and the length of paragraphs. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202). This course introduces students to technical and professional writing. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Describe the personal and cultural biases in texts that influence readers. Describe the approximate demographics for ideal audience of individual articles, journals, books and student essays. Determine biases appealed to through an analysis of the vocabulary, support and organization of a text. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. Explain, identify, and use organization patterns as reflections of the purpose and audience of the document. Determine if readers are a high-tech peer, a low-tech peer, a lay reader, or combinations of the above for specific documents. Define terms according to the reader's level of understanding. Involve audience through pronouns, contractions, positive word usage, and personalized tone. Use audience identification to apply appropriate rhetorical modes, strategies, and conventions. Identify and use the appropriate print or digital mode. Define argumentative appeals: ethos, logos, pathos. Identify the practical considerations related to ethics. Identify the legal considerations related to ethics, including knowing when you may need to seek legal counsel. Review ethical codes common in professional industries. Ethical Considerations Common to Technical Writing A. Use prewriting techniques to generate ideas and start the writing process. Participate in peer review by offering and accepting peer comments on written assignments. Revise rough drafts to meet the expectations of the audience and purpose. Edit rough drafts to produce polished documents with error-free text. Describe what makes a source reputable and reliable. Locate reputable and reliable sources using library databases, print materials, and/or internet sources. Synthesize researched information using paraphrases and/or quotations into technical writing documents requiring at least 1,000 words. Document integrated material adhering to the assigned documentation style. Simplify complex ideas, making them accessible to the intended audience. Write effective instructions and descriptions for documents such as user guides, instruction manuals, proposals, progress reports, websites, etc. Explain why visual aids are useful in technical writing documents. Determine what type of visual aid appropriately simplifies the information. Use computer software to create and situation visual aids in documents. Document data from secondary sources used in visual aids. Students will be introduced to representative works from various literary traditions and cultures, including numerous works from contemporary writers. Students will learn and apply the technical vocabulary used in the criticism of these literary forms. Collaborate with peers to create and/or revise documents. Solicit diverse opinions to address all stakeholder needs when creating documents. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202). Students will read, discuss and analyze works from three literary genres: the short story, the poem and the play. Analysis of Reader's Personal Tastes in Imaginative Literature A. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Speculate on the sources and background of those tastes. Identify what is most valued or devalued (privileged or marginalized) in the reading experience. Document changes in reading style and taste over the course of the semester. Reflect on what personal experiences are most brought to bear on the reading experience. Recognize the literary elements presently being studied (motifs, themes, symbols, characters, moods, etc.) in works the student has previously encountered in film, television or print media. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. Describe the reading experience of imaginative texts to other students in discussion groups. Review the reading experiences of other students in group discussion or with the full class. Locate major areas of personal and community interests and values, describing similarities and differences between them. Identify those aspects of an imaginative text that may generate multiple meanings. Identify those aspects of an imaginative text which may not allow for meaningful paraphrase, summary, simplification or reduction. In groups, construct a negotiated statement about the value, significance and possible meaning of a given text. JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. Recall and summarize the "facts" of a specific text. Review the technical vocabulary used in the criticism of short fiction. Differentiate between those details in a narrative that are significant to the plot and those that are not. Construct alternative plot lines at potentially significant textual moments. After outlining the sequence of events in a story, reconstruct the "fabula" of the story. Identify disruptive elements in a character's drive toward his or her goal. Identify patterns based on a character's speech, appearance, actions, interaction with other characters, values, material possessions and physical space. Differentiate between "flat"and "round" characters. Revise a "flat" character's profile to create a more fully dimensional personality. Speculate about the value systems that govern the behavior, thoughts and feelings of a given character. Identify and characterize two competing value systems dominating each short story read. Describe the dynamics of each value system and identify points of tension between them. Discuss those characters who seem to have an unstable relationship with either or both realms of value. Differentiate between traditional and constructed symbols employed in a text. Assess the value of a short story as an artistic achievement. Articulate the thematic bearing a story may have on marginalized populations. List a number of major poems and specific works in the Western literary tradition. Distinguish between the author and speaker of a poem. Describe the dramatic situation of a poem, including the speaker's predicament and vulnerability. Read poems out loud, responding meaningfully to the cues given in the text that indicate sense, rhythm, emphasis and closure. Draw distinctions between "counted" and "free" verse. Review the technical vocabulary used in the criticism of poetry, including stanza forms, metrics, tropes and traditional themes. Employ technical vocabulary in discussions of "counted verse." 3. Locate and characterize the predominant images in a poem. Identify and explain the use of metaphors in a poem. Identify and describe various "voices" found in poems, specifically characterizing those belonging to the "innocent" and "experienced" perspectives. The instruction will focus on skills essential to selecting, evaluating and synthesizing information from primary and secondary sources; in addition, it will emphasize the different approaches to organization that these media require as well as the variety of discourse styles used in informative, instructional, persuasive and entertainment media texts. Identify specific moments of "ambiguity" in a poem. Construct multiple meaning statements for a given poem. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202). This course teaches students to apply the writing process as well as fundamental rhetorical and composition skills to various interactive media including web pages, CD-ROMs/DVD, e-mail, kiosks, support materials, simulations, social networking and other electronic media. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Develop a writing process appropriate for creating interactive texts. Compose written profiles of published interactive media to establish criteria for effective writing with the genre. Generate controlling concepts using brainstorming and researching techniques. Arrange materials according to the project's rhetorical aim and the media's needs. Write projects for appropriate rhetorical aims and audiences. Make and assist others to make global, functional and editorial revisions in projects according to the conventions of the media and standard written English. Write and design materials suited to a hierarchical/clustered design. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. Review the technical vocabulary used in the criticism of written (not performed) dramatic texts. JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. Compose a written profile of the conventions for web sites or other media with internal links. Review the elements of traditional plot structures in Greek, Shakespearean and Modern drama. The final grade is based on the percentage of total points earned at semester's end. All work is graded on a point system and computed into percentages. Select on-line materials to integrate and link to site. Write prose that complements but does not rely on graphics. Edit prose to fit into organization of site and dimensions of a standard screen. Compose transitional words, phrases or icons to lead logically to other pages within the site. Characterize the conflicts created by the differing goals of characters in the same play. Identify significant choices made by characters in the play for which the consequences cannot be foreseen or controlled. 10%: Students will be given credit for attending class and participating in group discussion. Describe the various kinds of stages on which plays have been and are performed. Discuss the impact of the construction of the stage on the structure of the play itself. 30%: Students will be asked to write three essays that will analyze and comment on individual literary works. Develop a project with an expository or instructional aim. Describe conventions in virtual tour packages, slide shows, viral videos and other linear, multi-modal texts. Select appropriate secondary (library/electronic) sources to integrate into project. Write "voice over script" using conventions of spoken English. Coordinate visuals and "voice over" using a storyboard. Select appropriate materials to support the text's purpose. Compose proposal describing the project purpose and process. Distinguish between theatrical dialogue and everyday conversation. Examine the contradiction between what characters say and what they actually think and feel. Identify moments in the dialogue where the "subtext" breaks through into the dramatic discourse. Students will also be asked to write in-class essays that create thematic unity among various texts. 30%: Students will be given three examinations on the three literary genres in which they will be asked to discuss and analyze literary works in detail, define literary terms and apply those terms to specific works. Write and design materials for an interactive simulation experience. Develop a project with an instructional/educational aim. Describe various "paths" individuals might take through the simulation. Propose an original training or learning simulation. Devise and organize non-linear, inner-connected nodules or scenes using flowcharting strategies. Write scripts using appropriate format to indicate character dialogue, action sequences and user interactivity. Compose scenes incorporating multiple user choices. 10%: Students will respond to literature through reports submitted by in-class discussion groups. Compose scenes with dialogue "triggers" that determine the direction of the text. List criteria used to evaluate a play's performance and apply those to a specific production. 10%: Students will be asked to write plot summaries of the dramas. 10%: Students will respond to literature in daily journal entries that will require them to write about literary works in detail and connect them to their daily lives. Incorporate user-centered, highly-interactive media components. Demonstrate an understanding of searchable databases (kiosks). Analyze interactive databases and kiosks to identify current conventions. Compose a project proposal describing function and audience for a searchable database. Evaluate methods to collect data through primary research. Identify and categorize desirable attributes to use as search tags for data. Demonstrate an understanding of social networking tools. Compose text for use on a variety of social networking cites. This course focuses on the elements of narrative as well as the principles that drive virtual or alternative possible worlds (both fictive and reality-based), and it will provide students with practice writing and designing artifacts that demonstrate an understanding of plot, character, setting and the impact of structure and purpose in game development. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202). Games, particularly Role-Playing Games (RPGs) and other participatory narratives, share many properties with traditional narratives, yet differ significantly from their linear counterparts. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. The Purposes of Games and Participatory Narratives A. Supply information in an accurate and timely fashion. Develop an impromptu written style within the conventions of standard edited prose. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. Identify and describe games that inform or teach facts and skills. Identify and describe games that persuade users to adopt certain attitudes or teach desirable behaviors. Write a proposal for a game with an emphasis on its purpose and objective. 10-20% Analyses and reviews of previously published materials 60-70% 4-6 projects 10-20% Tests and in-class activities 100% Total FINAL GRADES A 90% - 100% B 80% - 89.9% C 70% - 79.9% D 60% - 69.9% F under 60% JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. Evaluate "Help" and supporting materials in currently published computer applications. Identify concepts and functions in published program to be included in a manual. Write primary (simple) and secondary (in-depth) definitions, explanations and troubleshooting screens. Describe the role of setting in digital narratives. Identify the relationship between setting and game challenges. Identify the relationship between setting and archetypal characters and character growth. Describe the role of design elements in games and digital stories. Describe the role of color and shapes in suggesting mood, tone, and physical sensations like heat, cold, hardness, sharpness, etc. Identify and discuss dominant art styles in establishing user expectations. Identify the role of setting in establishing narrative limits. Infer spatial limits within the game from the setting. Anticipate temporal limits within the game from the setting. Predict the physical laws within the game from the setting. Create detailed and appropriate settings for games. Analyze the role of setting in several forms of media (print, film, digital). Propose back stories and game objectives suitable to specific game worlds. Design (visually or textually) settings for an original scene in a game. Identify archetypal characters (hero, mentor, sidekick, higher self, allies, shape shifters, tricksters, threshold guardians, shadows, and heralds). Identify and analyze third-person viewpoint in games. List and describe the elements of characterization. List and describe the challenges in characterization. 2) Using flat and rounded characters to move the story and promote identification. Identify and analyze first-person viewpoint in games. Identify and describe the challenges of creating a first-person character to be played by all kinds of people. Identify and describe the challenges of inserting the first-person character into the story smoothly. 2) Providing player with the viewpoint character’s exposition. Identify and describe the challenges of creating a motive for the player/user in first-person games. Describe methods of revealing motives for characters within the game. Compile a character bible describing principle physical characteristics, personality traits and driving motives for several key characters in an original or published game. Write several pieces of dialogue with instructions for vocal and visual expressions for a single character in keeping with that character’s profile. Describe the role of and expectations for the tools used to experience digital narratives and games (interfaces, keyboards, controllers, specialized equipment). Employ techniques for establishing and modifying pace. Incorporate short- and long-term game objectives and goals. Analyze the role of gameplay in the interactive experience. Maintain a player’s log reflecting on game-playing experiences. Create a representation (textual, visual, video-diary, multi-media, etc.) describing the student’s individual definition of “gameplay.” V. Identify interactive variations including hierarchical, open, and common closed (string of pearls, multi-path, parallel tracts) structures. Describe the purposes of narrative plots in games and explorable worlds. Constructing “back stories” that act as catalysts for action. Creating narratives that establish objectives throughout a game. Students will write essays demonstrating their understanding of the works studied. Students will also sample from later literary works that draw on biblical sources for their inspiration. Describe plot types most appropriate for different kinds of games/digital stories. Describe the role of challenges in games and stories. List complications that arise from characters and their natures. They will learn to analyze these readings as representatives of the Bible's many literary forms. Students will read extracts from both the Hebrew and Greek portions of the Bible in translation. Identify and define the major divisions and genres comprising the contemporary Bible. Identify the literary forms used within the biblical genres. Explain the challenges of translation from Hebrew and Greek to English. Describe the translation choices for an assigned passage using both a strictly literal translation and several different idiomatic translations. Describe the major events in the formation of the contemporary biblical canon. Describe the major events in the translation process from the original texts to the present English Bible. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202). Discuss complications that arise from plot devices. Define complications that arise from the supernatural. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202). This course introduces students to the literary aspects of Bible. Describe the chronology of the history described in the text. Explain and discuss the importance of Torah in Jewish tradition from the earliest times to the present. Discuss the scholarly editorial theories of the Hebrew Bible texts, including the Documentary Hypothesis. Identify and discuss the major events of the Genesis accounts of creation. Identify and discuss the stories of the Hebrew patriarchs. Identify and discuss the major events in the Exodus narrative. Define and discuss the nature of the prophetic tradition in Hebrew culture. Discuss the role of David as a literary figure in the Hebrew tradition. Define and give examples of typical Hebrew tropes such as parallelism and chiasmus. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Identify the important differences between the four gospels, speculating on possible explanations for those differences. Explain and discuss the scholarly editorial theories of the first five books of the New Testament. Describe the traditional elements of first century letters. Discuss the various cultures represented in the recipients of the New Testament epistles. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. The readings, discussions and related writing projects will emphasize the relationship between mainstream America and borderland writers; explore the cultural and artistic context of the writers and their works; recognize and assess the use of major narrative and rhetorical strategies; and stimulate consideration of issues surrounding assimilation, identity formation, code-switching and cultural hybridity. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. Written primarily in English, the texts may include fiction, non-fiction, poetry, drama and/or film. Analyses and reviews of previously published materials: 20-30% 4-9 Projects: 50-60% Final and in-class activities: 20% Total: 100% FINAL GRADES A = 90% - 100% B = 80% - 89% C = 70% - 79% D = 60% - 69% F = under 60% JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. Perform a rhetorical analysis on one of the shorter New Testament epistles. Define apocalyptic literature and discuss the Revelation and Daniel in the light of that definition. Discuss the use of Hebrew Bible texts in the New Testament. Required Textbooks: Various translations, including Hebrew Scriptures translated by Jewish scholars, the Kings James Version of the Christian Bible, and other modern translations of both the Hebrew and Greek Scriptures. List and describe several challenges players will encounter in a proposed game. Define and describe the genres of mystery and morality plays. Demonstrate an understanding of the hermeneutical tradition drawing from the rabbinical tradition and patristic writings. Identify and evaluate the biblical analogies in selected writers such as Chaucer, Shakespeare, Milton, Bunyan, Hawthorne, Melville, Morrison or Baraka. Identify Spanish contact, conquest and colonization of the “New World,” and discuss residual effects. Texts from 16th- to 18th-century writers such as Alvar Núñez Cabeza de Vaca and Inca Garcilaso de la Vega. Texts from 19th-century writers such as María Amparo Ruiz de Burton and José Martí. Identify related literary and art movements in Spain and Latin America (e.g., modernism, surrealism and magic realism). Identify related political movements in Spain and Latin America (e.g., fascism, communism and socialism). Distinguish between major literary genres and recognize the conventions of each. Non-fiction (e.g., historical/political/social texts, memoir, personal narrative). Drama (e.g., El Teatro Campesino, Luis Valdez, Miguel Piñero, contemporary Latino/a drama and film). Identify generic hybrids and discuss unconventional writing. Identify when Latino/a writers switch linguistic codes (e.g., English, Spanish and Spanglish). Interpret instances of code-switching and speculate reasons for and implications of the practice. Discuss Miguel Algarín and Nuyorican Poets Café, Spanish Harlem and the Lower East Side (NYC), and writers such as Miguel Piñero, Pedro Pietri, Tato Laviera. Discuss César Chávez and Delores Huerta (grape boycotts), “La Raza” in California, Tejanos, Tex-Mex and the homeland myth of Aztlán. The course will emphasize the dynamic relationship between the literature and its contexts. Further, students will identify significant literary devices and genres as employed by these authors. Using the lens of gender, students will explore the social, historical, political and cultural contexts relevant to the literature. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202). This survey course introduces students to a representative sample of texts created by women from the mid-seventeenth century to present. Distinguish among major literary genres and recognize the conventions of each. Non-fiction (e.g., historical/political/social texts, memoir, criticism, personal narrative) 2. We will move beyond Composition I and Composition II, focusing on writing persuasively to a select audience; working together to anticipate and defuse objections; supply convincing evidence; synthesize the ideas of others to support our ends; look critically at all sources; and perfect a mature, polished style that is suitable to audience and occasion. Mexican-American “borderland” identity (Gloria Anzaldúa). To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202). This course offers challenging insights into the act of writing. Explain the concept of cultural hybridity (breaking profiles)—e.g., hyphenated America, both but neither, Latinos with African roots, Latinos with Native American roots. Analyze the practice of assimilation and resistance. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. Recognize and analyze significant instances of figurative language such as metaphor, simile, imagery, symbolism, irony and analogy. Explain the influence of the major literary genres in consideration of social, historical, political and cultural contexts. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Recognize significant historical contexts such as the Monroe Doctrine and Roosevelt Corollary, the revolt by and U. JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. Identify and define rhetorical strategies and devices such as themes, imagery, characterization, plot development, narration, symbolism and Aristotelian appeals (i.e., ethos, logos, pathos). Explain the importance of rhetorical strategies and devices as they apply to the literature. Explain the impact of the social, historical, political and cultural contexts on the use of rhetorical strategies and devices. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. S.-Mexican War and the Treaty of Guadalupe Hidalgo, the Spanish-American War (Puerto Rico, Cuba and Platt Amendment), immigration issues (legal and illegal), and the Civil Rights movements of the 1960s and '70s. Identify significant cultural contexts such as Mexican and Mexican-American cultures, Puerto Rican culture, other Caribbean cultures (Cuban, Dominican), Central American cultures and South American cultures. Identify significant artistic contexts such as 19th-century expectations, Modernism, Surrealism, Post-modernism and Latina Feminism. Identify and analyze multiple perspectives relating to the identity of women who are authors. Identify and analyze multiple perspectives of characters in literature authored by women. Contexts/Events may include Puritanism, Salem Witch Trials, Science and Rationalism, Urbanization, Education Reform, Slavery, Abolition, Women’s Rights, Industrialization, Civil Rights Movement, Modernism, Postmodernism and particular War Eras. JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. Explore all the resources of a traditional library. Work with the Internet, refining searches, selecting sources with discretion and learning how to refute arguments based on questionable sources. Use interviews as a regular part of source-supported arguments. Examine the social construction of female identity found in literature, including Virgin/Whore dichotomy, Maid/Wife/Widow, Motherhood, Public/Private person and Concept of the Other. Examine the social construction of gender as it is reflected in literature. Explain the importance and significance of contextualizing literature. Analyze the significance of influential social, historical, political and cultural contexts/events which impacted the author and/or the reading and/or the reception of the literature. Analyze the social locations of women authors, particularly in consideration of race, ethnicity, religion, sexuality and class. Analyze the social locations of literary characters of texts authored by women, particularly in consideration of race, ethnicity, religion, sexuality and class. Practice appealing to primary, secondary, and peripheral audiences. Examine and manipulate evidence for a specific audience. Construct a persuasive persona based on the needs of a specific audience. Manipulate emotional appeals for a target audience. Locate and Control Source Material with Precision A. Explain and apply the arguments of the first wave of feminist literary theorists (i.e., 19th and early 20th century) to assigned literature. Explain and apply the arguments of the second wave of feminist literary theorists (i.e., mid- to late 20th century) to assigned literature. Explain and apply the arguments of the third wave of feminist literary theorists (i.e., late 20th century to present) to assigned literature. Social, Historical, Political and Cultural Contexts A. Practice controlling voice within the demands of a rhetorical context. Use flaws in voice of opposing arguments as grounds for refutation. Think Critically, Using Logic to Promote a Desired End A. Manipulate logical fallacies to support an argument. Detect assumptions and biases in opposing arguments and use for refutation. Detect assumptions and biases in students' own arguments and use to advance their arguments. Analyze peer drafts and professional models for elements of effective composition. Analyze peer drafts and professional models for elements of effective rhetoric. Give substantive and specific suggestions for revising drafts. Discriminate among peer feedback suggestions: weak, lateral, and strong. Select diction appropriate in connotation, denotation, and tone for the rhetorical circumstances. Manipulate sentences at the phrase and clause level to achieve variety, clarity, and emphasis. Identify, evaluate, and manipulate the three classical categories of style. Practice deliberate style shifts within a larger communication to achieve a rhetorical effect. Recognize and manipulate stylistic elements of several discourse communities, both in and out of the academy. In addition, they will read other students' work and provide useful feedback on that work. Write with concision (unless rhetorical situation requires otherwise). Students will examine techniques of two or possibly three of the literary genres and then apply their knowledge to write in each genre. The reading assignments are based on the premise that, to be a good writer, students must have knowledge of literary techniques and be perceptive readers and critics. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202). Students will study and practice writing in two or three of the major literary modes of writing: poetry, fiction, and possibly drama. Compose Writer's Journal Entries on a Regular Basis 1. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Major Documented Argument (1200-1500) 150 points 6. Final (500-750 words) 100 points subtotal 650 points Additional Work: 1. 20 (approx.) homework assignment @ 3 = 60 points 3. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. 47 class-participation opportunities @ 3 =141 points subtotal 351 points Total possible 1001 points Grading Scale: 1001-900 points = A 899-800 points = B 799-700 points = C 699-600 points = D JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. Read published poems for inspiration to write about similar issues and topics. Identify and define the four major sound devices, including alliteration, consonance, assonance, and onomatopoeia. Analyze published poems for their use of sound devices. Compose an original poem that employs at least one sound device. Identify and define the major types of rhyme, including rhyme scheme, true rhyme, slant rhyme, and enjambment. Compose an original poem that employs a rhyme scheme. Identify and define the major metrical feet, including the iamb, trochee, anapest, dactyl, spondee, and pyrrhic. Identify and define the number of metrical feet per line, including diameter, trimeter, tetrameter, pentamenter, hexamenter, heptameter, and octometer. Identify and define the simile, metaphor, and personification as used to create imagery. Distinguish between the public symbol and the private symbol, and explain their use in creating imagery. Analyze published poems for their use of persona, tone, and irony. Compose original poems that adopt a specific persona and tone. Identify and define cliche, mixed metaphor, archaic diction, and hackneyed language and imagery. List and describe the five most popular fixed forms of poetry, including the Elizabethan sonnet, Italian sonnet, haiku, villanelle, and ballad. Analyze a published poem for each of the fixed forms, identifying its rhyme scheme, meter, and stanza structure. Identify the topics, themes, and treatments common to each type of fixed form. Compose an original poem that follows the form of any of the most common fixed types, and uses appropriate poetic techniques as described in the Major Elements of Poetry. List and describe the five most popular techniques of free verse poetry, including typography, anaphora, syntactical rhythms, line length, and syntax. Analyze a published poem for each of the free verse techniques, identifying its function. Compose original poems that employ at least one free verse technique, and use other appropriate poetic techniques as described in the Major Elements of Poetry. Students will then have the opportunity to revise this poem. Students will exchange copies of a poem with all members of the class and then evaluate them, both in writing and orally in class, with the instructor serving as the facilitator. Compose writer's journal entries on a regular basis 1. Read published stories for inspiration to write about similar issues and topics. Identify and define the elements that structure a narrative, including plot, conflict, complication, climax, resolution, rising and falling action, scene, flashback, pace, and epiphany. Analyze published stories for their use of elements that structure a narrative. Identify and define the six major types of characters, including protagonist, antagonist, flat, round, static, and dynamic. Analyze published stories for their use of the different types of characters. Identify and define setting as it is used to create the time and the place of a story. Analyze published stories for their use of setting. Identify and define theme as it is incorporated into a story. Identify and define the five narrative modes, including dialogue, thought, action, description, and exposition. Analyze published stories for their use of narrative modes. Identify and define the six major types of narrators, including first person, third person, objective, limited omniscient, reliable, and unreliable. Identify and define the four major types of narrative distance, including temporal, emotional, intellectual, and moral. Analyze published stories for their use of narrators and point of view. Identify and define the five major elements of style, including diction, syntax, density, the balance of narrative modes, and tense. Analyze published stories for their use of the elements of style. Write a premise and character sketch identifying and describing the nature of the conflict, the protagonist, the antagonist, the setting, the time frame, and the type of narrator. Based upon the premise and character sketch, compose an original story that incorporates all appropriate Major Elements of Fiction. Students will then have the opportunity to revise their story. Students will exchange copies of their story with all members of the class and then evaluate them, both in writing and orally in class, with the instructor serving as the facilitator. Compose writer's journal entries on a regular basis 1. Write sample dialogue, developing a conversation between two characters. Use plays for inspiration to write about similar topics and issues. Identify and define the unique aspects of drama, including dramatic impact, visual appeal, auditory appeal, physical production, continuous action, and spectator art. Analyze published plays for their use of the unique aspects of drama. Identify and define the five elements of a dramatic plot, including concept, scene, dramatic questions, pace and subplot. Analyze published plays for their use of dramatic plot. Identify and define the four major types of conflict, including person against person, triangular conflicts, the individual against society and inner conflict. Identify and define the three major methods of presenting characters, including vividness, depth, and a strong first impression. Analyze published plays for their use of character presentation. Identify and define theme as it functions in drama. Analyze published plays for their development of theme. Identify and describe the function of sets, lighting, a bare stage, and costumes. Identify the major elements of drama as used in the six major types of drama. Identify and define six major types of drama, including comedy, tragedy, farce, thesis play, expressionism, theater of the absurd. Identify the major elements of drama as used in the six major types of drama. Compose an original one-act play that is one of the six major types and incorporates all appropriate elements of drama. Identify appropriate magazines and journals to submit work to. NOTE: SOME INSTRUCTORS EXPAND THE WORKSHOP ELEMENTS OF WRITING POEMS AND STORIES AND ELIMINATE THE DRAMA UNIT. Identify the guidelines for submitting a manuscript. Students will provide written and oral critiques of their classmates’ work. Students may meet the written requirements of the course by writing poetry, fiction, creative nonfiction, dramatic scripts or any combination of the genres. This course offers serious writing students the opportunity to continue growing as writers and readers by studying the art of writing, producing a consistent body of writing, examining one another’s work and providing a supportive environment. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202). In this class, students will build upon the knowledge and skills learned in ENGL 223. Identify and employ a narrative structure through the use of a story arc: hook, conflict, complication, climax, resolution, rising and falling action, flashback and epiphany. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. Identify types of characters, including protagonist, antagonist, round, flat, dynamic and static. Develop characters through point of view, action and dialogue. Establish scenes and create convincing settings that employ the necessary amount of detail. Provide a balance of narrative modes, including description and exposition. Choose between first- and third-person narrators, reliable and unreliable narrators, and objective and limited omniscient narrators. JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. Poor editing and mechanics will seriously affect students' grade, as will turning assignments in late, being absent during peer evaluation workshops, or not following the instructions for an assignment. NOTE: METHODS OF EVALUATION MAY VARY, DEPENDING ON THE INSTRUCTOR. Generally speaking, if students attend class consistently, satisfactorily complete the requirements of the course, turn in their work on time, and show an understanding of literary techniques in their work, discussion, and peer evaluation, they will do well. Grading Rationale The determination of the final grade in this course is necessarily less objective than in most courses, given the nature of the subject. Grading Scale A = 100 A - = 95 A = 90 B = 88 B = 85 B- = 80 C = 78 C = 75 C- = 70 D = 68 D = 65 D- = 60 F = 50 F. Identify and incorporate into poems the major elements of poetry, including line length, stanza structure, sound, rhythm, image, diction and density. Establish a speaker with a specific persona and voice. Employ figurative language as a way to create imagery. Present theme as an outcome of the poem’s structure and imagery. Identify and evaluate the types of rhyme and meter. Identify and evaluate the various types of fixed-form poems, such as the Elizabethan and Italian sonnets, the villanelle, the pantoum and the sestina. Write poems, employing free-verse techniques and/or fixed-form techniques. Identify the similarities and differences between fiction and creative nonfiction. Articulate the differences between two types of creative nonfiction: memoir and the personal essay. Identify and employ the major techniques of creative nonfiction: image, voice, point of view, character, conflict, scene, dialogue and theme. Establish a balance between dramatization and interpretation. Identify and use any necessary types of research, such as interviews and Internet research. Learn to “work small,” choosing a specific topic that can be fully explored within the limits of an essay. Understand and apply the concept of essential truth as opposed to the facts only. Develop a one-, two- or three-act structure that includes an inciting incident, progressive complications, one or two turning points, a climax and a resolution. Identify the similarities and differences between fiction and dramatic scripts. Develop a concept in one or two sentences that has universal appeal and identifies the main characters and conflict. Produce a step outline, a one-sentence summary for each scene D. Develop an appropriate balance between image and dialogue. Develop characters according to the choices they make under pressure. Apply the principle of conflict by determining the stakes for the protagonist. In doing so, they will articulate a critical vocabulary for the craft of fiction and the writing process. Employ the proper page format for a dramatic script. In addition to writing fiction of their own, students will analyze published works of fiction, and they will provide feedback on their classmates’ manuscripts. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202). This course offers students the opportunity to continue to develop their skills in writing and reading fiction. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Employ a narrative structure through the use of a story arc: hook, conflict, complication, climax, resolution, rising and falling action, scene, flashback and epiphany. Use appropriate vocabulary in assessing one’s own and peer manuscripts. Write critiques of peer manuscripts that reveal a firm knowledge of the elements of writing. Practice professional etiquette for providing written comments on peer manuscripts. Practice professional etiquette for discussing peer manuscripts in class in a workshop format. Apply fellow students’ insights of peer manuscripts to one’s own work. Incorporate appropriate suggestions for revision as offered by peers. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. Maintain and improve learning outcomes from ENGL 223. Explain the techniques and choices involved in imaginative writing. JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. Develop characters through point of view, action and dialogue. Employ various types of characters, such as protagonist, antagonist, found, flat, dynamic and static. Creative convincing settings that employ the necessary amount of detail. Choose between first- and third-person narrators, reliable and unreliable narrators, and objective and limited-omniscient narrators. Employ theme as a natural development of the narrative. Provide a balance of narrative modes, such as description and exposition. Read a representative sampling of contemporary imaginative writing in fiction, poetry, creative nonfiction and dramatic scripts. Identify the elements of the various genres as they are found in published works. Articulate the diverse ways contemporary writers incorporate elements of the various genres. Use appropriate terminology in assessing one’s own and one’s classmates’ fiction manuscripts. Write critiques of peer manuscripts that reveal a firm knowledge of the elements of fiction writing as well as an understanding of the process of writing fiction. Practice professional etiquette for providing written comments on peer manuscripts. Practice professional etiquette for discussing peer manuscripts in class in a workshop format. Apply fellow students’ insights of peer manuscripts to one’s own work. Incorporate appropriate suggestions for revision as offered by peers. Students will be introduced to major classical and contemporary American and English poets, along with contemporary foreign-language poetry in translation. The course will cover major literary, historical and cultural movements as they relate to poetry. Students will study terms, patterns and forms that are useful for an understanding and appreciation of poetic verse. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202). This course emphasizes close reading and analysis of poetry by writers from different time periods, countries and ethnic backgrounds. Distinguish poetry from other major literary genres. Compare and contrast literary verse with musical lyrics. Maintain the consistency of characters through their thoughts, actions and dialogue. Revise as necessary the amount of description given to the settings. Revise to make consistent the choice of a narrator in terms of person, voice and reliability. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Identify and explain the importance of a poem’s sound as it pertains to the meaning and value of poetry by defining and applying the following terms: rhyme, rhythm, meter, assonance, alliteration, consonance, euphony, cacophony and onomatopoeia. Identify and explain the importance of various major poetic verse forms such as open form, closed form, blank verse, stanza, couplet, sonnet, villanelle, sestina, ballad, elegy, ode, pastoral, epic, haiku, limerick and concrete poetry. Describe the following major literary movements as they pertain to poetry. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. Define and apply terms related to meter such as sprung rhythm, caesura, end-stopped, enjambment, prosody and scansion. Define and apply terms related to rhyme such as exact rhyme, slant rhyme, near rhyme, off rhyme, imperfect rhyme, eye rhyme, end rhyme, internal rhyme, masculine rhyme and feminine rhyme. Define and apply terms related to words such as denotation, connotation, concrete, abstract, allusion, colloquial, general English, formal English and dialect. Define and apply terms related to voice such as tone, persona, dramatic monologue, sarcasm, satire and irony. Define and apply terms related to figures of speech such as symbol, metaphor, simile, pun, personification, apostrophe, hyperbole, metonymy, synecdoche and paradox. Major Literary and Historical Movements of British and American Poetry A. Revise for a more suitable balance between description and exposition. Identify and correct errors in grammar and punctuation, especially comma splices and unnecessary shifts in verb tense. JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. Students will discover the place of short stories in major literary movements, the key elements of short stories and interpretive approaches to short stories. Read a representative selection of contemporary literary fiction. Identify the elements of fiction as they are found in published works. Explain the diverse ways contemporary writers incorporate elements of fiction into their own work. Students will learn the historical fictional precedents of the short story; the similarities and differences between the short story and other narrative forms, such as the novel; the differences between the short story and its historical precedents, between short stories and film adaptations of them, and between commercial and literary short stories. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202). This course features significant opportunities to write about the literature and the reader's response to it. Interpretation of Short Fiction, Orally and in Writing A. Describe and differentiate the major approaches to interpretation: a. Describe major poetic theories and the uses of poetic theory: 1. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. Write one or more interpretive papers using the reader response approach. Write an interpretive paper using either the historical-cultural or textual-linguistic approach. Deliver an oral presentation using either the reader response interpretive approach to a story, the historical-cultural approach, or the textual-linguistic approach. Describe and differentiate at least four minor approaches to interpretation, including: a. Explain the importance of sound and form as they relate to the poem’s message and poem’s affect on readers. Explain the meaning of poems through close reading and the application of relevant literary terminology. Critically evaluate poems by applying information regarding sound, form and word choice as appropriate criteria. 20-60% A minimum of 2 formal essays or formal essay exams 0-40% Exams and quizzes 5-40% Journals or electronic discussions 5-20% One group project or individual class presentation 0-30% Participation or in-class activities Total: 100% JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. Analyze the significance of major historical and cultural events as they pertain to specific poems. Understanding and Appreciating Poetry as a Literary Genre A. Explain the relevance of a region’s culture, politics and geography upon specific poems. Explain the relationship between a country’s poetry and history. Assess the role of specific poets and poems in culture and society. Psychological, such as family systems and Freudian f. Write an interpretive paper, using any one of the minor approaches to interpretation. List and describe at least three narrative forms related to short fiction, including: 1. List and describe the 14 story-telling precedents of short fiction: 1. Compare and contrast the preceding narrative forms to short stories. Historical Story-Telling Precedents of Short Fiction A. Identify evidence of such precedents in short stories. List and describe the following major literary movements: 1. Identify patterns of such literary movements in short stories. Compare and Contrast the Key Differences Between Commercial Short Fiction and Literary Short Fiction VI. Describe, compare, and contrast at least five of the major genres of fiction. Identify the aspects of above fictional genres in short stories. List and Describe the Key Elements of Short Fiction, Including: A. Figurative language, including analogy, metaphor, and simile 7. Endings: plausible/ surprise/ walk away and implausible/ trick 11. Narrative angles such as third person-omniscient, third person-main character, third person-minor character, first person-main character, first person-minor character F. Family relationships, including parent-child relationships 12. Men and women; men and men; women and women relationships 19. Students will read, examine and critique a variety of children's literature selected by author, genre and historical time period. Society and the individual, including political issues 25. Students will identify children's needs and interests, list the criteria for choosing books for children, and demonstrate the means by which we can bring children and books together. Self-discovery, including coming of age, initiation, and self-deception 24. The course would also benefit those exploring the field of writing and illustrating for children. Identify, Illustrate, and Explain, Both Orally and in Writing, the Above Elements in Short Fiction. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202). Children's Literature is meant for all students interested in bringing children and books together but is especially suited for those who are students with English or education majors; teachers already in the elementary school classroom; parents; those working with children in preschools, day-care centers and libraries; and grandparents and prospective parents. Frequent tests on individual readings-at least five times during the semester (between 10%-20% of grade). Cumulative midterm and end-of-term examinations, a major part of which will be writing of the types described in Section I above (between 30%-40% of grade). Two major homework writings of the types described in Section I above (between 30%-40% of grade). To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. In-class participation: statements and responses to questions that illustrate mastery of the competencies I-VIII described above (between 10-20% of grade). Grading Scale: A = 90%-100% B = 80%- 89% C = 70%- 79% D = 60%- 69% F = Below 60% JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. The final grade in the course is based on the percentage of final actual points divided by final possible points. Recognize social and cultural impact on children's literature. Identify and discuss current content trends in children's literature which evolve from social and technological change. Identify goals and practices for adults involved in children’s literacy. Relate history of printing and books to modern children's literature. Explain the theories of didacticism which guided early children's literature. Identify and discuss milestones in the development of children's literature. Identify and explain the beginning of social and cultural inclusiveness in children’s books. Read, summarize and evaluate selected classic works. Define the standard genres of children's literature, including: 1. Identify and discuss emerging forms of children’s literature. Select, read, summarize and evaluate works within each genre. Define setting, point/s of view, characterization, plot, theme and style as they apply to children's literature. Identify and discuss these qualities within selected works. Analyze how past and current stories evolve from and reflect their cultures. Examine and analyze use of color, line, shape, texture, arrangement, typesetting. Identify artistic mediums such as oil/acrylics, pen and ink, watercolor and collage. Identify and research significant authors and illustrators of the past and present. Identify and select resources in our library specific to children's authors/illustrators. Identify and list requirements for major children's book awards, including: 1. Define and describe techniques for involving children with literature, such as: 1. Students will write essays demonstrating their understanding of the works studied. They will analyze drama from psychological, historical, philosophical, structural and dramatic perspectives. Beginning with the Greek dramatists and ending with the contemporary scene, students will read full-length plays and the comments of playwrights, directors, actors and critics. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202). This course introduces students to the analysis of plays as literature. Identify and define the elements of drama: plot, characterization, setting, dialogue, music, movement, and theme. Apply the elements of drama to a one-act play, "Lady Gregory's Rising of the Moon". Identify and cite examples of the traditional genres of drama: tragedy, comedy, and tragicomedy. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Name and define the parts of the Greek and Roman theaters. Name and define the distinctive elements of Greek and Roman tragedy and comedy. Define Old, Middle, and New Comedy, giving examples of each. Name the key figures in the development of Greek and Roman drama, describing the contributions and major works of each. Demonstrate at least one of the above techniques with children and/or with the class. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. Identify an appropriate topic, audience and vocabulary for a children’s book. Design, write, illustrate and construct a children's book. JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. Evaluate Antigone and Oedipus Rex as tragedies based on Aristotle's criteria. Identify and analyze appropriate levels of realism in children’s books. Define the purposes, uses and impacts of children’s realistic fiction. Explain the controversies surrounding the content of children’s realistic fiction. List and critique significant books of children’s realistic fiction. Identify and analyze banned, censored or challenged books. Explain reasons some books are banned, censored or challenged. Explain impact of censorship on children's literature and children. List and critique some commonly banned, censored or challenged books. Identify and analyze the intersection between text, author and reader, with specific attention to social and cultural diversity and inclusiveness in children’s books. Explain the importance of social and cultural diversity and inclusiveness. Explain the issues surrounding books representing diverse populations. List and critique significant books that feature social or cultural diversity and inclusiveness. H Discuss the treatment of women in Lysistrata and Antigone. Describe the nature and elements of medieval drama. Define miracle and morality plays and identify examples of each. Compare the worldview of Everyman with that of Antigone. Identify the contributions of Italian drama to the English stage. Describe the physical and economic nature of theater during the Renaissance. Name the major Elizabethan playwrights and identify the contributions of each. Explain the role of meter, verse, rhyme, and other poetic elements in Elizabethan drama. Evaluate Hamlet according to Aristotle's standards for tragedies. Discuss and evaluate critical interpretations of Hamlet from Dryden to the present day. Compare and evaluate several screen and stage adaptations of Hamlet. Evaluate A Midsummer Night's Dream according to the Greek comedy genres. Discuss the treatment of women in Shakespeare's plays. Identify non-English dramatists working during this period. Identify the major distinctions of the Restoration stage. Identify and explain the contributions of the major Restoration playwrights. Evaluate Congreve's The Way of the World as a latter-day New Comedy. Identify the physical and economic nature of the theater during the period 1850-1914. Name the major playwrights of the period and identify the contributions of each. Such non-British literary works may be from Australia, India, Asia, various regions of Africa or the Middle East. Additionally, the student will explore the literary differences between the British culture and one other culture that was governed by the British Empire. The course will emphasize the relationships among influential writers, their lives and times. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202). In this survey course, the student will study British literature written up to 1800, ranging from the Anglo-Saxon to the Augustan eras, including works by major authors such as Chaucer, Shakespeare, Milton and Swift. Outline the development of the Old English language. Explore the role of Freud and the rise of psychology in the drama of Ibsen, Chekhov, and Shaw. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Identify and describe the major movements in drama during the twentieth century. Discuss the effect of changing theatrical spaces and technological developments on the presentation of old texts and the creation of new ones. Discuss the move away from strict realism in The Glass Menagerie, The Piano Lesson, and other plays. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. Discuss major literary works from the Anglo-Saxon era, such as Beowulf. List the characteristics of oral-formulaic language. JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. Describe the presence and function of symbolic elements in The Glass Menagerie and The Piano Lesson. Identify some of the non-Western cultures that have contributed significantly to the broadening of drama in the twentieth century. Discuss the important themes in drama in the contemporary theater. Define the genres of the narrative, tale, legend, lyric, proverb, myth and other story elements. Discuss the major works of medieval British literature, such as works by Chaucer, Mallory, the Robin Hood legend and the Pearl Poet. British Literature I is NOT a prerequisite for this course. Such non-British literary works may be chosen from the traditions of Australia, India, Asia, various regions of Africa or the Middle East. Additionally, the student will explore the literary differences between the British culture and one other culture that was governed by the British Empire. The course will emphasize the relationships among influential writers, their lives and times. Recount the wars for independence and the rise of Napoleon. Explain the significance of the printing press to the history of fiction. Recount the expansion of the British Empire into Africa and the Middle East. Discuss the advances in science and the problem of alienation. Discuss major literary works from the Romantic era, including the writing of Blake, Wordsworth and Coleridge. Major authors from the Romantic, Victorian and Modern eras, such as Austen, Blake, Wordsworth, the Shelleys, Dickens, Tennyson, the Brownings, Eliot and Woolf, will be included. Describe the production of the first English translations of the Bible. Define the sonnet and recount its development in British literary history. List poetic techniques and forms used in Renaissance poetry. Discuss major literary works from the Renaissance, such as those by Spenser, Moore, Elizabeth I and Christopher Marlowe. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202). In this survey course, the student will study British literature written from 1800 to the present. Speculate about the influence of the poets’ lives on their writing. Define the idea of “Romanticism” and locate various literary devices and styles that give it expression. Recount important biographical details from Shakespeare’s life. Define the patterns of tragedy and comedy he employs in his plays. Describe the cultural milieu in which Shakespeare’s plays were performed. Discuss several of Shakespeare’s major works, such as Hamlet, King Lear, Twelfth Night, Henry IV, Part I, A Mid-Summer Night’s Dream or The Tempest. Describe the British explorations of the New World. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Discuss the connection of the literary lives of these poets to Europe. Recount the political and religious turmoil of this century, including the great plague and the great fire of London. Identify significant biographical details in the lives of major writers from the 17th century. Discuss the works of writers and poets, such as Lanyer, Herrick, Marvell, Milton and Bunyan. Define the epic and apply this definition to Milton’s Paradise Lost. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. Recount the development of modern English and discuss the relevance of Dr. JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. Define the “sublime” and the “gothic” as aspects of literature. Identify the major political ideals of Byron and Shelley. Speculate about the influence of Keats’ life on his poetry. Discuss the major literary works of the later Romantic era, such as poetry by Byron, Shelley and Keats. Define satire and speculate about the cultural and political conditions that give rise to it. Discuss the British love of “travel” literature and its relevance to Defoe’s Robinson Crusoe. List the key features of a “mock” epic and apply them to several works from the 17th century. Recount the British expansion into the New World and the development of trade routes. Discuss major writers of the 17th century, such as Dryden, Swift, Pope and Johnson. Compare British culture to one other culture in the British Empire. Discuss the rise of industrialism and the growth of cities. Describe Queen Victoria and recount major events in her life. Students read short stories and/or novels, view science fiction films and discuss key science fiction concepts. Discuss a Victorian novel, by a writer such as Dickens, Emily Bronte, Elliot, Stevenson, Kipling and Carroll. Describe the expansion of the British Empire in the Victorian era. Discuss Victorian essays, such as those by Macaulay, Arnold, Darwin and Mill. Describe Wilde’s social milieu and major biographical events. Discuss late Victorian plays, such as those by Oscar Wilde and George Bernard Shaw. Recount events leading up to England’s entry into World War I. Identify and discuss the poetry of the Great War, such as works by Brooke and Owen. List experimental techniques in fiction employed by such writers as Lawrence, Woolf, Joyce and Mansfield. Discuss works of early 20th century fiction by such writers as Lawrence, Woolf, Joyce and Mansfield. Students explore the unifying concepts of science and technology, depicted through imaginative narratives of the past, present and future. List some of the social and scientific advances in England with which Victorian poets struggled. Identify and describe specific poetic techniques used by Victorian poets. Discuss the poetry of the major poets of the Victorian era, such as Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Robert Browning, Tennyson and Hopkins. The Late 19th and Early 20th Century Drama and Fiction A. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202). This course examines the literature of science fiction, especially from 1960 through the present. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Explain the controversy of defining the science fiction genre. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. Recount the shrinking of the British Empire over the course of the 20th Century. Research the contemporary literary milieu of one of the cultures once ruled by the British, such as Australia, India, various regions of Africa or the Middle East, paying particular attention to “marginalized” literary voices and languages. Identify and discuss several literary works from this other culture. Compare the British literary culture to another literary culture in the former British Empire. Formulate and defend a definition of science fiction by analyzing and synthesizing elements of the controversy. Explain the relationship between science fiction and science and technology. Identify and discriminate among archetypes common to science fiction. In completing the course objectives, students will learn the conventions of writing about literature and become familiar with general reference materials useful in studying literature. Analyze and discuss common themes in science fiction. Identify and analyze literary devices common in science fiction, including allusion, analogy, allegory, metaphor and personification. Identify and analyze the use of symbols in science fiction. Discriminate between symbols and icons in science fiction. Finally, students will compare and contrast contemporary understandings of the individual and society with those expressed in the works studied. Attend an orientation tour of the library to learn about important sources related to the assigned texts. Prepare a bibliography of sources texts and literary periods. Prepare a bibliography of electronic sources including online databases and the WWW useful to learn about the assigned texts and literary periods. Summarize one article on each of the historical periods covered in the course. Find lyric poems for each of the major historical periods studied and compare and/or contrast their characteristics. In addition, students will analyze the assigned texts as literary works and as cultural artifacts and influences. Introduction to Library and Electronic Sources to Study Literature A. By grappling with the ideas and characterizations presented in each assigned literary work, the student develops meaningful insights into the attitudes and human conditions that have influenced and are still influencing America's national literary identity. Students will read selections representative of the epic, tragic, comic and lyric traditions primarily to gain knowledge of the works assigned. Explain the significance and employment of iconography in science fiction. Through this process, students will discover, analyze, synthesize and evaluate the ongoing negotiations between a great diversity of cultural aesthetics, political interests and public opinions in the shaping of American identity. American Literature II presents a series of literary works by American writers that reflects the attitudes and identity of our national literature and culture from the post-Civil War era to the present. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202). World Masterpieces introduces students to literary study using major literary works composed from the times of Homer to Shakespeare that have been influential in shaping and expressing values of Western culture. By engaging with, comparing and evaluating the conversations between popular music and fiction, poetry and criticism, students will explore the social, historical, political and cultural contexts relevant to the literature. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202). This survey course is a stand-alone course which need not be taken after American Literature I, covering the pre-Colonial period through the post-Civil War era. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Describe in writing and discussion personal responses to The Odyssey by Homer. Discuss in class important themes evident in The Odyssey. Identify characteristics of epic poetry found in The Odyssey. Compare several translations of The Odyssey and consider their respective merits. Explain the relationship between metatexts and icons in science fiction. No less than any other form of literature, all genres of American popular music are intertwined, engaged in dialogue and revealing of the American experience. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Identify and give examples of the genres used in American literature. Employ different literary approaches in the analysis of assigned course writings. Demonstrate an ability to write knowledgeably about literature, employing the most significant standards of literary scholarship. Discuss adaption of minority points of view and communities. Provide examples of innovative use of literary forms. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. Recall and summarize details of the assigned dramas. Describe in writing and discussion personal responses to tragedies by Sophocles and Euripides. Discuss in class important themes evident in the assigned tragedies. Describe historical development of classical tragedy. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202). Students read, analyze, evaluate and discuss the literature surrounding American popular music. Identify and analyze the impact of the blues, work songs, minstrelsy, vaudeville and medicine shows on the literature of its day. Read, compare and analyze literature by great American authors such as Whitman, Twain, Du Bois and Ellison which contemplates the significance of these origins. Identify formative life influences on the literary works of Hawthorne, Melville and Poe, and perhaps other writers as well. Explain the ways Hawthorne and perhaps other writers adapted the history of a specific place as the focus of his novels and short stories. Discuss the complexity of Melville's (and perhaps other writers') perception(s) of racial, national and/or legal matters in his novels. List Poe's (and perhaps other writers') contributions to various genres such as the mystery, the detective story and science fiction, as well as incorporation of gothic elements in his literary work. Civil War (1850-1870): Whitman, Dickinson, Lincoln, F. Identify poetic and rhetorical devices in these authors' works. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. Differentiate the perceptions of family life, especially parent-child relationships, as depicted in the literary works by these authors. Identify the distinctly American aspects of Modernism in these authors' works as well as those aspects held in common with the larger movement. Explain the use of cultural and economic diversity by each author as a means of making a statement about and impacting American society. List the forces that precipitated Modernism in addition to explaining the impact of World War I on that movement and the broader culture. Harlem Renaissance: Dunbar, Cullen, Hurston and Hughes A. Williams, Miller, O'Neill, Brooks, Baldwin, Kerouac, Ginsburg and Other Writers A. Describe key characteristics of the confessional style. 25-50% Two or three objective and essay exams 10-25% One or two impression/reaction essays 20-25% One written research project to include oral presentation in class 10-25% Attendance at one public literary reading of a published writer and submission of written description and critique of that experience 10-25% Quizzes and participation in class discussion Total: 100% JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. Review the major points of Aristotle's definition of tragedy and discuss the implications of that definition for one's understanding of tragedy. Compare several translations of one of the tragedies assigned and describe the effects of each. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Identify, describe and differentiate the cultural contexts for the rise of Ragtime, Hot Jazz, Early Tin Pan Alley, the Broadway Musical, Big Band and Western Swing. Read, compare and analyze writers such as Fitzgerald, Agee, Hughes, Giddens and Baillett, who analyze and probe the significance of the beginnings of an American mass musical culture. By grappling with the ideas and characterizations presented in each assigned literary work, the student develops meaningful insights into the attitudes and human conditions that have influenced America's national literary identity. Identify formative life influences on the literary work of Emerson and Thoreau and perhaps other writers as well. Critique the significance and the relevance of Emerson's message (and perhaps other relevant writers' messages) regarding individual autonomy, personal responsibility and self-trust. Define the influences of leading Transcendentalists on such later movements as abolition, environmentalism and civil disobedience. American Renaissance: Hawthorne, Melville, Poe and Other Writers A. 25-50% Two or three objective and essay exams 10-25% One or two impression/reaction essays 20-25% One written research project to include oral presentation in class 10-25% Attendance at one public reading of a published poet or fiction writer and submission of a written description and critique of that experience 10-25% Quizzes and participation in class discussion Total: 100% JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. Differentiate the perceptions of family life, especially parent-child relationships, as depicted in the literary works by these authors. Explain the importance of regionalism as a governing idea. Identify the use of autobiographical elements by these authors in each work. Exemplify the increasing use of psychology to delineate character and explain motivation. Identify the use of literary devices and learn the ways each author used other literary works as models or prototypes for these authors' literary works. Explain the use of cultural and economic diversity by each author as a means of making a statement about American society. World War I and Modernism: Frost, Moore, Chopin, Gilman, Fitzgerald, Hemingway and other writers such as Jewett, Wharton and Cather A. Describe the social implications of these writers' literary works. Identify these writers' use of dialect and comment on its effectiveness. World War II and Mid-Century Perspectives: Wright, T. Discuss the origin and nature of the Beat Movement and other literary schools of this period. Extrapolate from literary images significant life experiences. Post-Modernism and Ethnic Literatures: Cisneros, Silko, Erdrich, Morrison, Alexie and Other Writers A. Above all, students are expected to study assigned literary works before each class and to be courteous and receptive to interpretations other than their own. Recall and summarize details of the assigned plays. Describe in writing and discussion personal responses to a comedy by Aristophanes. Identify and read influential science fiction authors. View and analyze influential science fiction films. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. Identify, describe and differentiate the cultural contexts for the rise of Race and Hillbilly records as well as the advent of Be Bop, Jump Blues, Boogie Woogie and Bel Canto. Read, compare and analyze the literature of writers such as Gleason, Baraka, Murray, Hentoff, Kerouac, Mailer, Baldwin and Malone. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202). This survey course is a stand-alone course that presents a series of literary works by American writers that reflects the attitudes and identity of our national literature and culture from the pre-Colonial Period through the post-Civil War era. Explain the impact of Native American subject matter and the American landscape on these writers. Discuss the dependence of these writers on the traditions and forms of Europe as well as the ways these writers deviated from those traditions and forms. Transcendentalism: Emerson, Thoreau and Other Writers A. Describe the relationship between the personal lives of Whitman and Dickinson and perhaps other writers and their literary development. Discuss Whitman's and perhaps other writers' notions of patriotism and America's greatest achievements. Explain the mutual influences of the Civil War and the question of slavery in the literary works of Lincoln, Douglas and perhaps other writers as well. Identify ways in which Alcott's and perhaps other writers' novels and short stories serve as transition between the literature of the Post-Civil War Period and the nineteenth century. Explain Alcott's and Twain’s and perhaps other writers’ contributions to both the literary market place and the introduction of the theme of interracial relationships. Describe the developing expansion of the view of writers from this period both in its reappraisal of the American-European relationship and the Western expansion. Depict the relationship between formative life experiences and the works of Twain and other writers. Realism to Naturalism: James, Crane, and Other Writers A. The study of literature also requires attention to detail, a willingness to read and reread some selections numerous times, and a degree of interest and enthusiasm in the subject matter. JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. Identify, describe and differentiate the cultural contexts for rockability, rhythm and blues, rock and roll, doo wop, Motown, Brill Building, Nashville Sound, the girl group era, the folk revival and the British Invasion. Read and analyze the dialogue between the music and the literature of writers such as Gillette, Marcus, Werner, Mason, Ehrenreich, Escott and Bond. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Contrast the views of exploration and the New World demonstrated by John Smith, William Bradford and other early settlers. Identify the attitudes toward Native American people expressed in these writings. Colonial Era: Bradstreet, Wheatley, Edwards and Other Writers A. Identify several literary devices used by Franklin, Jefferson and perhaps other writers as well. Describe the cultural and historical contexts that fostered these writers and formed their points of view. List the qualities that Franklin (and perhaps other relevant writers of this period) identified as leading to personal success in America. List the contributions that Franklin and Jefferson, among others, made to American democracy. Early Republic: Cooper, Irving, Longfellow and Other Writers A. Regular attendance and participation will be expected. Read in small groups examples of ancient Greek lyric poetry. Discuss and analyze the influence of literary awards on the genre, including the Nebula and Hugo awards. Identify, describe and differentiate the cultural contexts for the rise of Blues Rock, Album Rock, Art Rock, Arena Rock, Countrypolitan and Outlaw Country, as well as the parallel development of soul. Read and analyze the dialogue between the music and the criticism of critics such as Flippo, Marsh, Landau, Christgau, Willis, George and Nelson. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. Identify and give examples of the genres used in American literature. Employ different literary approaches in the analysis of assigned course readings. Demonstrate the ability to write knowledgeably about assigned literature, employing the most significant standards of literary scholarship. Foundational Era: Smith, Bradford and Other Writers A. List major influences on the literary development of Bradstreet, Wheatley, Edwards and other writers of this period. Explain the influence of or resistance to New England Puritanism in Colonial-era writers. Revolutionary Era: Franklin, Jefferson and Other Writers A. Grades will be based on written essays, research, and critique; objective and essay exams; and daily quiz/discussion class participation. Identify, describe and differentiate between the cultural contexts for the evolution away from the rock hegemony, including the development of Philly Soul, funk, hip-hop and punk rock. Read and analyze the dialogue between the music and the works of writers such as Mc Neil, Rockwell, Tosches, Toops, Tate, Eric-Dyson, Hornsby, Foster-Wallace, Lethem and Chang. JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. Identify significant writers working today and in recent years. Explain the ways in which these writers participate in earlier American literary traditions as well as the ways they innovate. Describe the changing economic situation for literary writers and discuss how that shapes their output and their career choices. Discover, identify, and appraise the cultural contexts for the students' own aesthetics. Explain, analyze and evaluate individual works of music based upon the students' aesthetics, informed by the cultural contexts provided by the course. Compare/contrast, describe and evaluate how contemporary artists synthesize the cultural contexts of the literature of American popular music. Provide specific examples of unique mixtures of cultures and their expression in various ethnic literatures. Post-Post-Modernism and Contemporary Perspectives: Wallace, Oates, Kushner and Other Writers A. Describe in writing and discussion personal responses to The Aeneid. Discuss in class important themes evident in The Aeneid. Identify characteristics of epic poetry found in The Aeneid. Describe in writing and discussion personal responses to The Metamorphoses. Compare The Metamorphoses to epic and lyric poetry. Describe significant themes present in The Metamorphoses. Identify influences of The Metamorphoses on later artistic expressions. Survey in class qualities of Latin tragedy, comedy, and lyric poetry. Take notes on characteristics of Latin tragedy, comedy and lyric poetry. Contrast Latin and Greek and contemporary attitudes toward epic, tragic, comic, and lyric poetry. Describe in writing and discussion personal responses to The Inferno. Discuss in class important themes evident in The Inferno. Identify characteristics of epic poetry found in The Inferno. Compare several translations of The Inferno and describe the virtues of each. Identify important literary qualifies of Dante's Divine Comedy. Recall and summarize details of The Canterbury Tales. Describe in writing and discussion personal responses to The Canterbury Tales. Discuss in class important themes evident in The Canterbury Tales. Identify important literary qualifies found in The Canterbury Tales. Compare several translations of The Canterbury Tales and describe the virtues of each. Find in the library or on electronic sources examples of medieval lyric poetry. Take notes on the development and practice of lyric verse during the Middle Ages. Compare and contrast medieval lyrics with the Greek and Latin lyrics read. Recall and summarize details of The Tragical History of Dr. Describe in writing and discussion personal responses to The Tragical History of Dr. Students verify their judgments by summarizing and analyzing these important concepts, using discussions, and writing effective, well-organized essays in response to specific films. Students read the textbook, view short and full-length films, and discuss important cinematic techniques and concepts. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202). This course examines the development of cinema from the early experiments in the late 1800s up to the present day, presenting the history and art of both American and international cinema. Recall and summarize details of the assigned dramas. Describe in writing and discussion personal responses to tragedies by Shakespeare. Discuss in class important themes evident in the assigned tragedies. Take notes on the relation of Elizabethan tragedy to Senecan tragedy. Describe historical development of Elizabethan tragedy. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Describe similarities and differences between film and other literary genres such as fiction, poetry and drama. Discuss specific film adaptations of novels, short stories, plays or nonfiction texts. Explain the importance of technique as it relates to the film’s message and effect on viewers. Analyze the implicit meaning of specific films by applying appropriate interpretive theories and terminology related to relevant film techniques. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. Find in the library or on electronic sources examples of Renaissance lyric poetry. Take notes on the development and practice of Renaissance lyric verse. Compare and contrast Renaissance lyrics with the medieval and Greek and Latin lyrics read. JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. Use the library and electronic sources to identify major non-Western literary works. Compare or contrast one of the Western texts read with a non-Western text. Describe reasons a contemporary Western reader might have difficulties understanding a non-Western text. Consider the effects of establishing a literary canon. Identify and describe three necessary principles of film: 1. Discuss the function of the screenplay and the role of the screenwriter. Define, describe and apply key elements related to narration in film: 1. Define, describe, and apply key elements related to character: 1. Define, describe and apply key elements of narrative structure to film: 1. Define, describe, and apply other major literary elements related to narrative film: 1. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202). Apply examples of the above genres to specific films. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. Interpret films using one or more of the following theoretical approaches: cultural, ideological, historical, formalist, genre, narrative, auteur, feminist, psychological and economic. Critique films on the basis of how well they employ various techniques related to story, cinematography, editing, sound, mise-en-scene and acting. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. Describe the following developments in the history of film: 1. The development of feature length narrative films during the silent era 3. Emergence of sound and color in the American studio system 5. JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. Explain the importance of historical developments on narrative film. Evaluation of student mastery of course competencies will be accomplished using the following methods: Evaluation will be based on typical assignments such as readings, discussion, written assignments (such as critical reviews or research papers), web-based research, individual or group projects, etc., dependent upon the needs of the topic and the instructor. Describe characteristics the following major film movements: 1. Any specific Special Topics topic may not be repeated within a four-semester sequence. Individual faculty members are responsible for the creation of Special Topics courses and for seeking approval to teach them. The E & J Division Dean will determine when and if the course may be taught based on the instructional needs of the department and the division. The English Department Curriculum Committee, the English Department Chair, and the English & Journalism Division Curriculum Committee will review each Special Topics course to be offered and approve the course content. In order to maintain course consistency, rigor and uniqueness, each section of this course first must be reviewed and approved by the English faculty prior to its being offered. The course Content Outline and Competencies must be written in outcome-based language. Special Topics in Literature and Composition may be repeated for credit but only on different topics. The Special Topics course outlines must be designed in the standard format for all JCCC-approved courses and must include the standard course objectives for a Special Topics class. The course may also include selections drawn from various national literatures in translation and a range of historical periods. Because of the nature of a Special Topics course, the course Content Outline and Competencies will vary, depending on the Special Topic being offered. Identify directors and films associated with those movements. Students will engage with a wide range of texts, including those from print, film, and other media. Explain the relevance of the country’s history, culture, and politics on specific films and directors. Assess the importance of specific films and directors upon the specific country. Discuss the influence of foreign films upon Hollywood films. Discuss the influence of Hollywood genres and films upon foreign films. In this class, students will have the opportunity to refine their critical reading and writing skills by investigating in-depth a single important theme, topic or genre (e.g., environmental literature, the literature of illness, detective fiction, travel literature, the documentary film tradition, creative non-fiction). Define terms associated with the following components of film: 1. Access Services is located on the 2nd floor of the Student Center (SC 202). English 292 is a 200-level thematic literature and writing course. To schedule an appointment with an Access Advisor or for additional information, you may send an email or call Access Services at (913)469-3521. If you are a student with a disability and if you are in need of accommodations or services, it is your responsibility to contact Access Services and make a formal request. While every attempt will be made to place DVDs on reserve in the college library, students may need to rent or purchase access to films on DVD or via streaming services. JCCC provides a range of services to allow persons with disabilities to participate in educational programs and activities. Apply terms appropriately in papers and discussions when describing and analyzing films or scenes from films. Esl Essay Ghostwriting Service For College;. 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